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Hip replacement

Hip replacement is a surgical procedure in which the hip joint is replaced by a prosthesis (an artificial joint). Hip replacement surgery can be performed as a total replacement, also called total hip arthroplasty, and it consists in replacing both the acetabulum and the femoral head while hemiarthroplasty generally only replaces the femoral head. Hip prostheses consist of a ball component, made of metal or ceramic, and a socket, which has an insert or liner made of plastic, ceramic or metal. The implants used in hip replacement are biocompatible, meaning they're designed to be accepted by your body and they're made to resist corrosion, degradation and wear. 

Hip replacement is typically adopted for people with hip joint damage from arthritis or an injury. Followed by rehabilitation, hip replacement can relieve pain and restore range of motion and function of your hip joint. The goal of hip replacement surgery is to relieve pain and increase the mobility and function of a damaged hip joint. The surgery is commonly practiced in epidural anesthesia, but in relation to the case, the anesthesiologist may choose the best solution. The surgical technique also uses minimally invasive approach, with small skin cuts and maximum respect of the muscles. The access road is usually the postero-lateral hip with the advantage of saving the abductor muscles (gluteus medius and small) More than 35,000 hip replacements have been done by our Group of Surgeon and they perform more than 1,500 of these surgeries annually. 


In Humanitas 
Before the intervention it is evaluated the radiography and it's made the preoperative planning. During this stage the surgeon chooses the final prosthesis. 

The surgery is commonly practiced in epidural anesthesia, but in relation to the case, the anesthesiologist may choose the best solution. The surgical technique also uses minimally invasive approach, with small skin cuts and maximum respect of the muscles. 

The access road is the postero-lateral hip with the advantage of saving the abductor muscles (gluteus medius and small), but in some special cases, the surgeon makes use of other means of access. The intervention was followed by a short hospital stay (mean 10 days): during the first two days the patient has to rest in bed in the supine position with a pillow between your legs spreader, mobilization exercises are performed passive and active. In case of need, the patient can stand in an upright position as early (1 day). 

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